The Development of A. Jacob Marks and the Skram Furniture Company

A. Jacob Marks

Saturday, June 27, 2015 @ 1:30pm - 2:45pm

A. Jacob Marks founded Skram Furniture Company in 2001 in the Piedmont region of North Carolina. Recently named one of the top 50 young designers of the Americas (Young Designers: Americas, Daab), Jacob’s work is rooted in a philosophy that argues for the inextricability of good design and fine workmanship. With Jacob's guidance as principal and lead designer, Skram Furniture Company has earned a domestic and international following for its distinctive approach to modern design—one that emphasizes sustainable practices, authentic materials, and extraordinary workmanship.

Jacob will talk about how he, a history major in college, started Skram Furniture Company as a one man shop in the woods of North Carolina, and how he has developed it into the 10 man, 26,000 square foot shop it is today.

Biography

Jacob A. Marks

Skram Furniture is a truly a creation of A. Jacob Marks. His designs for Skram are both austere and warm - as is he. He is serious, hardworking, but as you get to know him, warm and generous. His interest in history is clear in how he talks about Skram’s approach to manufacturing as rooted in the belief that the objects produced by a society are a reflection of the character and priorities of that society. The company seeks to promote an interpretation of sustainability that directly impacts not only what is produced, but also the mode of production. Jacob and Skram furniture bring the artisan back to the factory, producing objects on a scale that permits the fulfillment of volume orders without sacrificing the attention to detail expected by its customers.

Quality, durability, restraint, utility—skram furniture is a reflection of these resurgent American ideals. Leading by example, the company embodies an ethic that merges innovative, useful design with meticulous workmanship and an encompassing view of sustainability.

Jacob lives with his wife and family outside Durham, NC. When not building furniture, they mess around with older trucks, vegetables, and bees.