FS14

Reconnecting the craftsman with the community.
Our 18th annual conference gathering, FS14, took place in Port Townsend, Washington. THIS EVENT HAS CONCLUDED -- conference information is retained here for the historical record.

FS14_logo The Port Townsend School of Woodworking hosted the Conference, dates were June 19 - 21, 2014.

About Reconnecting the craftsman with the community:

Local craftsmen and local materials have been at the heart of furniture making for most of its existence. With exploration of the globe came access to new materials, new techniques and new inspiration.

churchThe wheel has turned - focus is returning to local resources. The local food movement has a powerful call - connecting the consumer with the farmer next door. As furniture makers, we need to accept the local challenge and reconnect the consumer with craftsmen in their community and local sources of materials. Every region has a distinct voice - climate and topography govern the woods available, history drives the narrative, each region has a palette of colours, and local industries produce other unique materials. How do our creations reflect our history, communities and surroundings?

We’d like to challenge the current generation of makers to think about the local narratives and styles that we will pass on to future generations of makers. Can we create the dialog, styles and visions that will be the foundation for the future?

 

 

FS14 Sponsors

The Furniture Society wishes to thank our conference sponsors for their generous support.

Lead Sponsors:

Other Sponsors:

Pre-Conference Workshop: Digital Design and Fabrication - Sat, June 14 - Wed, June 18, 2014

Taught by Randy Johnson of Shopbot Tools, this five-day course (Saturday through Wednesday) offered woodworkers, builders and fabbers at all levels an in-depth introduction to the programming and operations of a three-axis CNC (digital) router. The benefits and limitations of CNC routing were explored.  The course was open to woodworkers, builders and fabbers at all levels and interests. Wood was the primary material cut during the class, but the design and machining techniques covered in the class could also be applied to other materials such as plastic, aluminum and foam.

 

Program for Thursday, June 19, 2014 - Saturday, June 21, 2014

Download the Program

Along with lectures, demonstrations, and panel discussions, a large part of the conference program will include on-going workshops and works in progress that conference attendees will be able to watch and participate in.  The following workshops are open to all conference attendees and included with your daily conference pass.

On-going workshop 1:  Planking a Boat with the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding.  Watch or participate in the construction of a traditional wooden boat. Students and staff from the NW School of Wooden Boatbuilding will be planking a small boat during the conference.

The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding is located in Port Hadlock, Washington, about twelve miles south of Fort Worden. The School is accredited to teach three one-year long boatbuilding programs in traditional and modern wood-composite boat construction. It typically hosts 50 students and builds 15-17 boats each year. Graduates, who earn an Associates in the Occupational Specialty of Wooden Boatbuilding, are in demand anywhere fine craftsmanship is valued.

On-going workshop 2:  From the Forest, an interactive event, will be led by local furniture makers and educators adept at working with traditional woodworking tools. Starting with a whole Madrona tree, a log, some dried slabs from local trees and salvaged rippings from our local lumberyard, participants and workshop leaders will work in a loose and creative manner working green and salvaged materials with an array of traditional and nontraditional tools.  There will be demos throughout the day by various makers from riving a plank from a log to finishing and everything in between.

On-going workshop 3:  digiFabulous is a 3-day conference event sponsored in part by ShopBot Tools and AutoDesk. It will highlight 3 artists working digitally. During the event they will each work live on their own CNC project allowing conference-goers to engage with them and experience how real artists interface with and execute high-quality designs using CNC technology.

Artist #1:  Reuben Foat - "I have become enamored by the tambour door—an elegant and unique furniture component rarely used in furniture today. Digital Fabrication processes, especially the use of computer- aided design (CAD) and computer-numerically-controlled (CNC) routers, make this otherwise intricate and tedious door, both an approachable and faster endeavor. Over the course of the three day conference, I am proposing to manufacture three (one per day) wall-hung cabinets in response to my journey from southern California to Port Townsend. Keeping in mind the theme of the conference, tambour doors can move like trains along a track or a river across a landscape. ‘Creating a sense of place’ in the interior microcosm of a series of tambour cabinets will be my goal. These cabinets will be completed for sale at the auction."

Artist #2: Christy Oates - Christy's project will explore non-traditional carving techniques using the CNC router.  The designs will utilize machining bits and simple flow commands created using the CAD software, rather than a pre-planned traditional carving pattern.  Christy attempts to exploit CAD/CAM machine capabilities in her work and the results are often a pleasant surprise.

Artist #3: Kimo Griggs - "The University of Washington is known for an explosion of cherry blossoms every spring. As older cherry trees on campus begin to weaken, and as new construction projects necessitate the removal of healthy stock, campus arborists carefully remove the trees, and bring some of the material to us in the College of Built Environments Fabrication Labs - chunks of tree trunks up to two-feet in length. We have begun to find meaningful new uses for the wood. Some will be milled and stored to dry, but we are particularly excited about designing and making items that express the nature of fresh, green wood as it arrives to us. We will be bringing chunks of freshly-cut cherry wood from which we will cut three-footed vessels. Designs with thin walls and three feet to stand on will allow the character of the wood to be expressed - movement of the wood as it dries should not adversely affect the utility of the vessel. We hope to produce at least one vessel per day, using a flip-milling process."

Kimo’s colleague Roark Congdon will be joining him for the conference. Roark has training in architecture & sculpture, and recently received a Master of Science doing research with Kimo. He has been hired to head up UW’s Digital Fabrication Staff and also teaches in the UW Department of Architecture. Roark has a lot of experience with CNC equipment and will be a great addition!

On Saturday, June 21, a digiFabulous panel discussion will be moderated by the American Craft Council’s Perry Price. The panel will consist of the three artists and special guest, Ted Hall of ShopBot Tools. The discussion will explore the direction of digital technologies, what's next, and engage the audience in a conversation based on their experiences over the last 3 days.

On-going workshop 4:  Re-Forestation: How to Make a Tree From a Chair is a project by Ashley Eriksmoen joined by Steve Withycombe and portrait AJEMichael Hamilton. Attendees are able to drop-in, make together, and contribute to the production of our own collaborative grove of trees made from broken and abandoned wood furniture. The format of the workshop will be similar to projects at past conferences such as the Allagash Barrel Project in Maine.

The project stems from research into rates of world timber harvesting, global consumption of new wooden furniture, and municipal waste per nation measured through landfill growth. Re-Forestation addresses repercussions of consumer culture, specifically the out-of-balance cycle of casually discarding older, yet salvageable, furniture and so easily replacing it with cheap, semi-disposable furniture. The prevailing manufacture/consumer system overlooks the true costs of timber harvesting, underpaid labour, and garbage. The ratio between the time and resources it takes to grow a tree and the fleeting lifespans of contemporary furniture is perverse.

17.Eriksmoen_Ashley#12C6D58The situation current and future generations face is that there is pressure on natural resources, a need to take care of the objects that already exist, to protect our beautiful natural resources (such as Olympic National Park) and keep them renewable through very select and worthy usage. The type of furniture-making most of us engage in is certainly sustainable through the longevity of objects made and the low volume we produce. Second hand timber is a valid resource--one we have ample access to in societies with such socio-economic circumstances that we can afford to dispose and waste things. Many of us could agree that much of the furniture produced in global export manufacture would have been happier to stay as trees. The Re-Forestation project reminds us of the importance of “think global, act local” in our own practices.

 

Download the Program
Michael Aubry for AutoDesk- Saturday June 21, 1:30 - 2:45 in School House 2

Furniture Design - Exploration and Automation

Physical tools have evolved. Just like the electric table saw made wood work in the last century simpler, CNCs and 3D Printers today are poised to enable all of us to build amazing stuff even easier. As these new and advanced machining tools continue to become both cheaper and more cost effective, the intersection between digital and physical tools will continue to become all the more intertwined. Indeed, the next batch of innovation and creation will belong to those who best use these new tools to enhance their creativity and automate their tasks that are mundane. The path to great physical parts continues to come through great digital parts.

During this presentation we’ll get to know two talented wood workers I’ve had the privilege to work with this last year who are looking to scale and grow their businesses during this crazy new industrial revolution we’re all caught up in. I’ll share with you their stories, and dig into some of the physical and digital software tools and resources they’ve used to do great things – both visionary and pragmatic. By the end of the presentation you should be excited about where manufacturing is headed, feel inspired by super cool designs, and be empowered to go try new ideas. See you there!

Michael Aubry is a Technology Evangelist for Autodesk, a global leader in 3D design software. He works with designers and engineers to help push the boundaries of what they’ve done and open opportunities to enable new success. He’s worked in the computer-aided-design industry for the last ten years working with furniture, bio-medical orthopedics, wind turbines, consumer electronics, wearable designs, and robotics. His big side project right now is participating on a team to create an unmanned aircraft to help prevent Rhino poaching in South Africa. He has a Mechanical Engineering degree from the University of Portland.

Vivian Beer - Saturday June 21, 3:00 - 3:50 in School House 1

Traveling Collaborations with Susie Silbert

In this lecture Vivian and Susie will take you on a cross country journey following Vivian’s Desert Design Lab project. The project, supported by the John D. Mineck Furniture Fellowship, traveled for two months in an RV trailer (a mobile studio/home) through the America’s Western Deserts with two goals. The first to develop Beer’s new Desert Impressions body of work spending an extended period of time in a number of remote landscapes/eco-systems to gather images and textures. The second, to foster exchange by inviting a number of artist/designers/writers/craftsmen to collaborate on location. Visitors included, Susie Silbert, Jenn Anderson, Tanya Aguiniga, Noah Sakamoto, Adrien Segal, Hannah Vaughan, Josh Torbick, Sophie Glenn, and Steffanie Dotson. The presentation will share and “unpack” the project, what it means to travel for inspiration, work with place and collaborate in a new environment.

Furniture Society board member Vivian Beer is a designer/maker working in New England. Her collections include the Smithsonian’s Renwick Gallery, MFA Boston, and the Brooklyn Museum, public art for Portland ME and Cambridge MA. She holds an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art and was a resident artist at SUNY Purchase, SDSU in CA and Penland School in NC. Vivian tiptoes through contemporary design, craft and sculptural aesthetics, sampling from each one. She deftly counterbalances a strong knowledge of contemporary furniture design with the history of industry and architecture to create furniture that intends to transform our expectations of and relationships to the domestic landscape.

Michael Cooper - Saturday June 21, 4:00 - 5:00 in Commons A

The Chair as Sculpture

“The Chair as Sculpture series was born from a project I assigned to my Furniture Design class at De-Anza College in 2002.  My teaching practice is to develop my own piece slightly ahead of the class in order to demonstrate the materials and techniques for the assignment.  Problem solving and exploring unusual processes make the work more interesting to me and I try to pass this on to my students.   My attraction to working in wood, steel and aluminum with the inclusion of kinetics comes through in my work. I love industrial design, furniture design and, mostly, sculpture and have melded those disciplines in this series of chairs. I will share the design and execution processes of this series in my presentation.”

Michael lives in Sebastopol, California where he works daily in his studio adjacent to his home. He typically works in wood and metal or a combination of both. His most recent work is influenced by his interest in combining organic and geometric forms with kinetic elements. He completed his B.A. in Commercial Art and his M.A. in Sculpture at San Jose State College before attending U.C. Berkeley where he completed his M.F.A. in Sculpture in 1969. Michael retired from Foothill-DeAnza College, Cupertino, California in 2004 after teaching as an Instructor of Art for 34 years. During his professional career he’s been honored with numerous awards and fellowships and has participated in multiple one-man and group shows. He is represented in various publications, and private and public collections.

Craig Curtis - Friday June 20, 9:00 - 10:00 Commons A, B & C

Place Based Design

In the field of architecture, the term regionalism has been used to define an architectural style that is in response to a particular place. Often characterized by the use of local materials, sensitivity to climate and historical precedents, regionalist architecture has been embraced by many firms who have capitalized on this design approach to create distinction among their peers. In the Pacific Northwest, a regionalist approach was applied to the modern movement, throughout the 1950's - 1970's, resulting in a body of work that is considered Northwest Modern, and largely recognized as being developed by a group of architects informally known as the Northwest School. The Miller Hull Partnership grew out of the end of this movement, with the firm's beginning in 1977. Miller Hull’s style of work has evolved in response to the pressures and opportunities of the global economy, and the influences of technology and performance based design. In addition, they now work all over the country, as well as internationally, while still honoring the tenets of a regionalist approach to design. Call it taking regionalism on the road. Craig will present examples of work to illustrate his firm's approach to design, with special emphasis on how a regionalist approach can lead to results that respond to the most important challenge of our time; climate change.

Craig is a partner at The Miller Hull Partnership. Craig’s spirited design exudes a regionalist approach to modernism and a passion for sustainability, which has resulted in many award-winning projects. As a result of his tireless advocacy for the profession, his work has had widespread impact strengthening communities and has spurred policy change. Craig is one of the lead designers of the Bullitt Center in Seattle.

John DeHoog - Thursday June 19, 3:00 - 3:50 in School House 2

Picking Up the Pieces: Detroit

Detroit has big problems right now, including the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history, high crime, and massive urban blight. Nearly 80,000 buildings sit empty and derelict, awaiting a near certain fate of demolition and removal. While normally this debris is hauled to the landfill, a few forward thinking individuals have realized there is value in the deconstruction (instead of demolition) of these abandoned buildings. In this budding industry, workers carefully harvest century-old flooring, timber, hardware, and decorative elements and sell them for re-use in furniture and custom interiors. This presentation follows the trail of these materials during each step of the process, from the hands of the deconstruction work crew to the hands of furniture makers and designers.

John is a professor in the Art Department of Eastern Michigan University. He has a BFA from Northern Michigan University and a MFA from the Rhode Island School of Design. Recent exhibitions include work in the Grand Rapids Art Museum.

Forest Dickey - Friday June 20,  11:30 - 12:15 in School House 2

Showing Well with Bart Niswonger

Forest and Bart will present strategies and sound advice on ways to prepare and show your work optimally at furniture fairs and shows such as the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) and other shows across the nation. Information will include negotiating square footage price, choosing the right show for your business, and making an impact at the show.

Forest Dickey is a Furniture Society Board Trustee and the founder and lead designer at Varian Designs. He obtained undergraduate degrees in Fine Art and Art History at the University of Chicago before later completing his Masters in Fine Arts in Furniture Design and Woodworking at San Diego State University. Inspired by the quality of tradition, and created with sustainable, reclaimed, salvaged materials he launched his first five “core” designs, the Timber Collection. Currently, Varian has released fourteen designs spanning three collections. The collections continue to grow as Dickey follows his inspirations.

Thomas Dolese - Thursday June 19,  4:00 - 5:00 in School House 2

Strategies for Making a Living Building Furniture

Tom will present some of the strategies for the business of woodworking while pointing out some common pitfalls that can impede success. Skills developed in the shop are very important as a furniture maker, but putting effort into the business side is often overlooked, and just as critical for a successful career.

Thursday June 19,  11:30 - 12:30 in Room B, Building 315

Demonstration: Horizontal Mortiser

See how to quickly and easily execute complicated joinery with a horizontal mortiser. Tom will show how he makes the compound angle joints for the side rails of chairs and how he glues and clamps up the chair sides.

Tom has been building commissioned and gallery pieces for more than 20 years. He teaches chairmaking at his shop in Bellingham and at the Port Townsend School of Woodworking. Tom and his wife, Jennifer, are both members of Northwest Woodworkers Gallery in Seattle and Artwood in Bellingham.

John Economaki - Friday June 20,  4:00 - 5:00 in Commons A

Too Stupid to Quit

When furniture designer John Economaki developed a severe allergy to wood dust, he turned from making furniture to making heirloom hand tools for woodworkers. Drawing on his background in woodworking and deep appreciation for aesthetics, Economaki established Bridge City Tool Works in 1983. In this talk, John will discuss how he uses the most contemporary digital technology to design tools that stand the test of time.

In 1983 John Economaki's life changed overnight. Hospitalized with pneumonia, the furniture maker received devastating news. The cause: an allergic reaction to the dust from rosewood, his material of choice. Within months of closing his studio and returning deposits for countless furniture commissions, Economaki established Bridge City Tool Works. Now, 40 years later, Bridge City Tool Works is recognized worldwide as the source for exquisite tools for hand woodworking.

Ashley Eriksmoen - Thursday June 19,  10:15 - 11:15 in School House 2

Presentation: Re-Forestation: How to Make a Tree from a Chair

Re-Forestation is a project that addresses repercussions of consumer culture - the out-of-balance cycle of casually discarding older, yet salvageable, furniture and so easily replacing it with cheap, semi-disposable furniture. Working with the local dump, Ashley retrieved abject and abandoned wooden furniture destined for landfill, and regenerated the timber for a third life, a return to trees. This lecture goes hand in hand with the on-going 3-day workshop of the same title, and, going more in depth on the subject, and will include imagery of Ashley’s work on the project in Australia.

Thursday June 19,  11:30 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

Friday June 20,  10:15 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

Saturday June 21,  1:30 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

On-going 3-day workshop - Re-Forestation: How to Make a Tree from a Chair

The workshop is a project by Ashley Eriksmoen joined by Steve Withycombe and Michael Hamilton. Attendees are able to drop-in, make together, and contribute to the production of our own collaborative grove of trees made from broken and abandoned wood furniture. The format of the workshop will be similar to projects at past conferences such as the Allagash Barrel Project in Maine.

Ashley Jameson Eriksmoen studied fine woodworking at the College of the Redwoods; M.F.A. in Furniture Design at Rhode Island School of Design. Eriksmoen is a furniture designer/maker who exhibits internationally. She has taught at California College of the Arts, College of the Redwoods, Oregon College of Art & Craft, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Penland School of Craft and, is currently, the Head of Furniture at Australian National University School of Art.

Dale Faulstich - Friday June 20,  10:15 - 11:15 in School House 2

Totem Poles: Stories Told in Wood

Totem poles tell stories of many kinds. Dale's work for the Jamestown S'klallam recount the history and traditions of the 'Strong People.’ The poles are carved from first-growth cedar by Dale and a team of volunteers.

Dale Faulstich has been producing both commercial and fine art since 1972. Dale's home and studio are located on the North Olympic Peninsula in Washington State where he lives with his wife, Heather, and their two children. His fascination with the art form of the aboriginal people of the Northwest Coast has strongly influenced his work. Dale works as the Master Carver for the Jamestown S'Klallam in Blyn, Washington.

Reuben Foat - Saturday June 21,  1:30 - 2:45 in School House 1

On-going 3-day workshop – digiFabulous, with Kimo Griggs and Christy Oates in Building 306A and Building 304A

digiFabulous is a 3-day conference event sponsored in part by ShopBot Tools and AutoDesk. It will highlight Reuben Foat, Kimo Griggs, & Christy Oates, artists who work digitally. During the event they will each work live on their own CNC project allowing conference-goers to engage with them and experience how real artists interface with and execute high-quality designs using CNC technology.

digiFabulous Panel Discussion, moderated by Perry Price with panelists Ted Hall, Kimo Griggs, & Christy Oates

Following the three day digiFabulous event, join the conversation as we delve deeper into the use of digital fabrication by the event participants, the future of the technologies as envisioned by its proponents, and examine lessons learned by the community. Expect a conversational but uncompromising look at the promise and the perils of new technologies for the field.

Reuben’s experience spans from cabinet making in the United Kingdom and New England, to restoring furniture in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He holds a MFA from San Diego State University and teaches at art/craft centers across the country such as the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. He has also been a lecturer at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and is currently a lecturer at San Diego State University in California where he now lives.

David Franklin - Friday June 20,  10:15 - 4:00 in Building 315, Room B

Demonstration: Traditional Northwest Carving Techniques

David will demonstrate the use of regional carving tools such as bent knives elbow adzes, lip adze, and the "D" adze. Conference attendees will have an opportunity to try these tools under close supervision. David will also have examples of his preferred local woods as well as his work.

David’s first experience as an artist was with a graffiti crew in Denver when he was a teenager. In this world there was no discipline or way to find the skills required to achieve real artistic success. He moved to the Northwest in the early nineties for a fresh start and sought out people who could instill real skills and experiences that could propel his career into a larger art world. He served an informal 12-year wood carving apprenticeship to Duane Pasco, a successful regional artist. He was gaining first hand experience in, not only graphic and sculptural skills, but in all levels of producing art on a large scale from design to fabrication and installation. This mentoring relationship and example of work ethic led from the most basic compulsion to express himself to a rewarding professional art career. This experience gave David opportunities to work with and for artists who continue to be his heroes in that field: Marvin Oliver, Joe David, Shaun Peterson, and Preston Singletary.

Kimo Griggs - Saturday June 21,  1:30 - 2:45 in School House 1

On-going 3-day workshop – digiFabulous, with Reuben Foat and Christy Oates in Building 306A and Building 304A

digiFabulous is a 3-day conference event sponsored in part by ShopBot Tools and AutoDesk. It will highlight Kimo Griggs, Reuben Foat, & Christy Oates, artists who work digitally. During the event they will each work live on their own CNC project allowing conference-goers to engage with them and experience how real artists interface with and execute high-quality designs using CNC technology.

digiFabulous Panel Discussion, moderated by Perry Price with panelists Ted Hall, Reuben Foat, & Christy Oates

Following the three day digiFabulous event, join the conversation as we delve deeper into the use of digital fabrication by the event participants, the future of the technologies as envisioned by its proponents, and examine lessons learned by the community. Expect a conversational but uncompromising look at the promise and the perils of new technologies for the field.

Kimo is an architect and fabricator, teaching design studios and workshop-based coursework in materials, making, and digital-design-and manufacturing technologies. He received his B.A. and M.Arch from Yale University, and studied at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London on a Rotary International Fellowship. Kimo previously taught at the Yale School of Architecture, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, the Columbia University School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, and Carnegie-Mellon University. He was the 2002 Teacher of the Year at the Harvard GSD. He co-authored a Wiley textbook, Digital Design and Manufacturing in Architecture. He also contributed the new Digital Manufacturing section to the most recent Architectural Graphic Standards.

Steve Habersetzer - Three-Day Event in the Edensaw Tent

From the Forest

From the Forest, an interactive event, will be led by local furniture makers and educators adept at working with traditional woodworking tools. Starting with a whole Madrona tree, a log, some dried slabs from local trees and salvaged rippings from our local lumberyard, participants and workshop leaders will work in a loose and creative manner working green and salvaged materials with an array of traditional and nontraditional tools.  There will be demos throughout the day by various makers from riving a plank from a log to finishing and everything in between.

Steve is a self-taught, artisan woodworker of 35 years. His skills and desgins reflect a deep interest in ecological problem solving with a specialty in non-toxic construction and finishing.

Ted Hall - Saturday June 21,  1:30 - 2:45 in School House 1

digiFabulous Panel Discussion, moderated by Perry Price with panelists Kimo Griggs, Reuben Foat, & Christy Oates

Following the three day digiFabulous event, join the conversation as we delve deeper into the use of digital fabrication by the event participants, the future of the technologies as envisioned by its proponents, and examine lessons learned by the community. Expect a conversational but uncompromising look at the promise and the perils of new technologies for the field.

Ted Hall is the president and CEO of ShopBot Tools, which began in his workshop/barn more than 15 years ago. A professor of neuroscience at Duke University, Ted's hobby was building plywood boats, and he thought a computerized cutting tool called a CNC router would be helpful. He started thinking about a practical way to make one of the tools less expensively, and working out the details of the tool while growing excited over the possibilities of affordable CNC led him to begin spending more time designing tools than building boats.

Michael Hamilton - On-going 3-day Workshop with Ashley Eriksmoen

Thursday June 19,  11:30 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

Friday June 20,  10:15 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

Saturday June 21,  1:30 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

On-going 3-day workshop - Re-Forestation: How to Make a Tree from a Chair

Born in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, Michael spent much of his youth exploring local and regional woodlands and making things of wood. Such things as teddy bear caravans and small boats. At a young age he began “helping” his grandfather, a Swedish millwright and carpenter, connect boards together. This experience fostered an appreciation of skilled hands and attitudes which transform one’s vision into material form. Having trained as a cabinetmaker in several fixture and cabinet shops in Portland, Oregon Michael eventually moved to Port Hadlock, Washington to be close to the woodlands, trails, rivers and mountains of the Olympic Peninsula. At Port Hadlock he started working with a regional clientele building and designing custom furniture and cabinetry and often developing decade long relationships with the homes and estates of his clientele. After forty years of making with wood, including furniture for an exceptional estate on the shores of Lake Washington and distant locations such as Takamori, Japan Michael recently has come full circle with making custom teddy bear car seats for a long standing patron.

Ian Hanna - Thursday June 19,  11:30 - 12:15 in Commons A

Responsibly Resourced Materials with Allan Parachini

We love to use beautiful woods in our work. How do we know the origins of materials we use and whether any of those materials represent endangered resources? Recent prosecutions of guitar makers for using illegally sourced wood have raised the profile of this issue. Join FS Board Member Allan Parachini and FSC (International) Business Development Director Ian Hanna for this panel discussion.

Ian is the Director of Strategic Development for the Forest Stewardship Council. He works to shift the wood and paper purchasing of businesses, consumers and governments to responsible, sources such as FSC certification provides. Ian hails from the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State.

BA Harrington - Friday June 20,  4:00 - 5:00 in School House 1

Implementing Harvest-to-Use in a Woodworking Program

In 2004, the Wood Center at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) invested in a Wood-Mizer portable bandsaw mill. Over the last decade a “Harvest-to-Use” program has been implemented in various ways by the IUP woodworking area. Trees felled on campus and the surrounding area due to disease, safety concerns, or new construction, are secured through cooperation with facilities management and milled on site. In addition to exposing students and the broader campus community to the comprehensive cycle of tree-to-lumber, this provides an invaluable situation for dialogue around ideas of renewable resources, community sustainability, collaboration, regional identity, as well as the conceptually potent ideas of "place" and “emotionally laden” materials. This presentation will cover the history of IUP’s Harvest-to-Use program, including various campus projects that have utilized IUP lumber and Harrington’s current focus on incorporating the program at every level of the curriculum. It will also briefly discuss the Wood Center’s participation in efforts toward developing a minor in Sustainability Practices at IUP.

BA Harrington received her traditional training in the Cabinet and Furniture-making Program at the North Bennet Street School in Boston. After a decade of working as an independent, custom furniture maker, she returned to academia and her studio art background, graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a MFA in wood, and a Master’s Degree in Art History. She is currently Assistant Professor of Woodworking at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Stephen Hogbin - Thursday June 19,  4:00 - 5:00 in School House 1

Rethinking the Past: Makers Interpret a Museum’s Collection

In 2012 Stephen curated the exhibition Rethinking the Past. Six artists who had links to the region looked at the permanent collection of Grey Roots Museum, Owen Sound, Ontario. The work in the exhibition will be presented with a review of the strategies and ways to work with museum staff and the artists.

Friday June 20,  3:00 – 5:00 in School House 2

Relevance: Finding a Context

Imagining the future and finding a relevant context for the maker.

Relevance: “the relation of something to the matter at hand.” This is a useful definition for art, craft and design and has been a guide for me. Another meaning is “applicability to social issues” and that suggests being fully engaged within a context and a community. Applicability is a good word made up of apply and ability. Unwrapping the issues of relevance are essential to the work and how it finds a home. Imagining a relevant future is fraught with problems and possibilities. This presentation will look critically at how to make connections for the maker to become relevant. When starting out it is essential for long-term survival to find a context that works for the future. Integration into a chosen community is essential. Furniture makers have four distinct ways of connecting to their market as a: gallery artist, bespoke maker, manufacturer and educator. Working towards one or two with a clear strategy is essential for longevity in the domain. The presentation will focus on the early years.

Stephen, a Canadian, graduated from the Royal College of Art in London, England. He started work as a studio artist in 1970 and was elected to The Royal Canadian Academy in 1983. He received the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012. Stephen exhibits widely in North America and beyond. He has had 36 solo exhibitions and over 200 group exhibitions in Australia, Canada, Europe, Japan, Korea, Russia and the U.S.

Miguel Ibanez-Gomez - Saturday June 21,  1:30 - 2:45 in Commons A

Finding the Future by Looking to the Past

North Bennet Street School opened in 1881 as a school of craft with a mission to provide the immigrants in Boston’s North End neighborhood with the skills to find meaningful employment. Over the next 100 years it evolved as a school with regional, national, and finally international reach. In the past ten years the school has returned to its roots, focusing once again on the North End neighborhood and the City of Boston to provide inspiration for its training programs and the key to its future. This presentation will trace the beginnings of the school and the re-establishment of its local ties that led to the school’s September 2013 re-opening in a new 65,000 sq. ft. facility.

Miguel Gómez-Ibáñez, President of North Bennet Street School, is the first graduate of the school to serve in that position. During his tenure the school has established partnerships with numerous cultural and educational institutions in the Boston area, expanded the school’s full time and continuing education programs and, in September, 2013, moved from its home of 132 years on North Bennet Street to a new facility on North Street in Boston’s North End, bringing all eight professional training programs under one roof for the first time in a decade.

He has combined a first career practicing architecture with his North Bennet Street School training as a cabinet maker to become a nationally recognized designer and maker of studio furniture. His work has been featured in numerous journals including House and Garden, Good Housekeeping, American Craft and Fine Woodworking, and has been exhibited in galleries and museums across the country. . He has contributed articles and essays on furniture and design to a number of books and magazines, including Fine Wood Working, Woodworker’s Journal, and Furniture Studio, and is a past president of The Furniture Society.

Jake Jacob - Friday June 20,  3:00 - 3:50 in School House 1

A Treehouse is Like a Good Chair

Treehouses are things of beauty and, like chairs (and boats), are subject to a wide range of dynamic and cyclical loads. Jake will share how treehouses are designed to cope with these loads and create unique living and working spaces.

Jake Jacob is one of the leading treehouse builders in the US. Jake has worked as a Marine Engineer, Timberframer, Treehouse Builder and runs a reclaimed lumber business. Jake is a cofounder of the Treehouse Workshop with Pete Nelson. Jake has built treehouses in 35 states and 10 countries.

Bebe Pritam Johnson - Thursday June 19,  11:30 - 12:15 in School House 1

Speaking of Furniture: Conversations with 14 American Masters - A Talk & Book Signing

Bebe Pritam Johnson, co-author of Speaking of Furniture, tells why this book is important, why the authors persisted, and why it took so long.

Friday June 20,  1:30 - 2:45 in Commons A, B & C

Extreme Furniture Making: A Conversation with Two American Masters: Richard Scott Newman and Brian Newell, moderated by Bebe Pritam Johnson

Richard Scott Newman and Brian Newell have pushed the boundaries of what’s possible in furniture and wood craft.  In this candid exchange, get a first-hand account of the idiosyncratic ways in which these two extraordinarily gifted artist-craftsmen conceive and construct their complex furniture pieces.  Does doubt ever enter their mind?

Bebe was born in St. Louis, Mo, and lived in Colorado, Chicago, and St. Louis until college. She received an AB degree in Philosophy from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, and a MS in Journalism/Communications from Boston University/University of Illinois. She and her husband, Warren, moved to New York City in 1965, where Bebe became director of Asian Program Operations at the Council on International Educational Exchange. The Johnsons made the move to the East End of Long Island in 1978 and, shortly afterwards, began creating a business that would focus on an emergent decorative arts movement that would be called studio furniture. The partners opened Pritam & Eames in 1981 in East Hampton, NY. Bebe has served as a trustee of the Furniture Society and the Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Deer Isle, ME, and as chair of the FS 2008 conference program at the College of Arts + Design, State University of New York, Purchase, NY,. She and Warren are co-authors of the 2013 publication of Speaking of Furniture: Conversations with 14 American Masters, and they are also co-recipients of the Furniture Society’s 2014 Award of Distinction.

Shelly Leer - Saturday June 21,  4:00 - 5:00 in School House 1

The New Upholsterers

Upholstery, like many traditional crafts has seen a marked decline in the last few decades and, like many others, is seeing a revival with furniture savers, a new generation of craftspeople and being used by artists.

Shelly has been taking apart furniture and restyling it for more than 20 years. A graduate of Butler University with a degree in Design and Textiles, she is owner of the ModHomeEc Studio in Indianapolis, a fully dedicated teaching studio offering DIY classes and workshops. Shelly was a featured writer for Curbly.com, a contributor to ApartmentTherapy.com Chicago, and runs the blog ModHomeEc.com. She’s currently a DIY contributor to HuffPostHome.com and HOUZZ.com.  She’s had projects appear in Country Living Magazine, Real Simple Magazine, the Design Sponge at Home book and was a co-author of three DIY books published by Curbly.com. Shelly spent five years writing a weekly DIY column, DIY Journal, for The Indianapolis Star.  She has appeared often on Channel 8’s IndyStyle to share her projects and class offerings. 

Christopher Martin - Thursday June 19,  3:00 - 3:50 in Commons A

Creating a Sense of Place

In Ghana there is a tradition of entire villages engaging in or supporting a specific craft form as their primary industry. These are places where craft, culture, and community have been intertwined for generations by use of local materials to produce beautiful cultural artifacts. These people are torn between sustaining their traditions and their desire to modernize and “prosper.” Chris will discuss the work of various villages, the impact on his personal work inspired and share how his desire to “do something bigger” has led to the development of a new curriculum at Iowa State University.

Chris earned a MFA in furniture design from Rhode Island School of Design. As an Associate Professor in the Department of Integrated Studio Arts, he continues to design and make one of a kind furniture pieces. From 2008 to 2010 Chris was US Peace Corps volunteer in Ghana. After seeing infinite variations of development concepts, seeing what works and what does not, he has developed interest and passion for issues of sustainable development.

Daryl Morgan - Friday June 20,  11:30 - 12:15 in Commons A

What's Next? with Jay T Scott

When students graduate and want to continue woodworking, their options are limited. Determined graduates will find a way to continue learning but the measured, sequential kind of training, like apprenticeship, is a thing of the past. The hope for the future of craft education lies with established craft professionals who are willing to pass their skills and experience to the next generation. Most artisans don't have the time or the inclination to take on apprentices. Are there ways for local collective groups of craft professionals to make sure the body of craft knowledge remains available and relevant?

Daryl was a practicing artisan furniture designer/maker for over 30 years and is currently in his 14th year of teaching Furniture Design, Furniture Making, and Traditional Japanese Architecture and Building Practice at The Evergreen State College. He is also a founding board member and instructor at The Arbutus Folk School in Olympia, Washington.

Chris Mroz - Thursday June 19,  1:30 - 2:45 in School House 2

Extreme Wood Bending

Chris will demonstrate the bending of Cold-Bend Hardwood™ and participants will be able to bend their own hardwood knots and keep them as take-a-ways from the session. There will be numerous dramatic bentwood parts on display and a short slide show of built projects will be shown. The seminar will be interactive, with plenty of chances to bend wood and ask questions.

Chris Mroz owns and manages Pure Timber in Gig Harbor, Washington, USA. Mroz has a background in both arts and sciences. A customer good naturedly accused Mroz of witchcraft in his ability to bend thick solid hardwood by hand. And his shop tends to resemble a combination science lab and witches brew, complete with boiling cauldrons - (the autoclaves), mysterious ticking and groaning machines (the wood presses) and wood that takes on most unnatural shapes.

Katie Nartonis - Saturday June 21,  3:00 - 3:50 in Commons A

Seachange: Visionary Hand-Made Coastal Architecture

An exploration of the historic mid-century environments of legendary makers J.B. Blunk and Art Carpenter and their emphasis on conscious living.

Katie was hired by Bonhams in 2002 and she has been privileged to handle objects of great beauty and rarity, produced by the 20th Century’s most celebrated designers, architects and makers. She created the long-running and highly popular Bonhams Design Lecture Series which has featured intimate chats with legendary Californian craftsmen + artists such as Sam Maloof, Otto Heino, John Nyquist, Garry Knox Bennett, Michael Cooper and Larry Bell. She is currently curating a show for the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles: “Jack Rogers Hopkins: California Maverick.” It is slated to open in the Spring of 2015.

Brian Newell - Friday June 20,  11:30 - 12:15 in School House 2

Artist Presentation

Friday June 20,  1:30pm – 2:45pm in Commons A, B, & C

Extreme Furniture Making: A Conversation with Two American Masters: Richard Scott Newman and Brian Newell, moderated by Bebe Pritam Johnson

Richard Scott Newman and Brian Newell have pushed the boundaries of what’s possible in furniture and wood craft.  In this candid exchange, get a first-hand account of the idiosyncratic ways in which these two extraordinarily gifted artist-craftsmen conceive and construct their complex furniture pieces.  Does doubt ever enter their mind?

Brian Newell was born in Flint, MI in 1966. He made his first woodcarving in 1976, was thrown out of college in 1989, found his way to the College of the Redwoods, Fort Bragg, CA, and met Jim Krenov. Later that year, Newell sold a student piece for $3,000 and left the College to conquer the world. Humbled but unbroken, he found a job in a small pattern shop in Chicago carving prototypes for the model car industry. After three years of model making, he returned to furniture making, and continued to develop his signature style of carving. In 1997, he married Mari Ito in her native Japan, where he would live and work uninterrupted for nearly ten years. Newell currently maintains a workshop in Fort Bragg, California, and one in Atsugi, Japan. Newell is the recipient of two Windgate Foundation grants for artist residencies, one at the College of Arts + Design, State University of New York, Purchase, NY in 2010, and the other at San Diego State University in 2014.

Richard Scott Newman - Friday June 20,  1:30pm – 2:45pm in Commons A, B, & C

Extreme Furniture Making: A Conversation with Two American Masters: Richard Scott Newman and Brian Newell, moderated by Bebe Pritam Johnson

Richard Scott Newman and Brian Newell have pushed the boundaries of what’s possible in furniture and wood craft. In this candid exchange, get a first-hand account of the idiosyncratic ways in which these two extraordinarily gifted artist-craftsmen conceive and construct their complex furniture pieces. Does doubt ever enter their mind?

Friday June 20,  3:00pm – 3:50pm in Commons A

Artist Presentation

Born in the Bronx, NY in 1946, Richard Scott Newman pursued engineering physics at Cornell University until he found his way to the School for American Craftsmen at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), NY. He received a BFA in woodworking and furniture design in 1972 from RIT, where he studied with Wendell Castle, Bill Keyser, James Krenov, and Jere Osgood, all of whom are FS Award of Distinction honorees. Newman has taught furniture making at RIT and at the Wendell Castle Workshop, Scottsville, NY; he has also taught banjo making at RIT. Newman had started making banjos while at Cornell, and has since divided his professional career into two uneven parts: musical instrument making and furniture making. After 45 years of object making, he still maintains his shop in Rochester where he occasionally makes furniture but more commonly now makes banjos and teaches swing dancing.

Newman received a fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts in 1988, and one of his banjos was included in the national tour of the 1978-79 exhibit, Harmonious Craft, organized by The Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian Institution of Art, Washington, DC.

Bart Niswonger - Friday June 20,  11:30 - 12:15 in School House 2

Showing Well with Forest Dickey

Bart and Forest will present strategies and sound advice on ways to prepare and show your work optimally at furniture fairs and shows such as the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) and other shows across the nation. Information will include negotiating square footage price, choosing the right show for your business, and making an impact at the show.

“I started making furniture while a graduate student in Computer Science. It was a way to maintain a connection with my family: my father is a professor of printmaking and a painter and my sister is a ceramic sculptor, so I grew up thinking about design and aesthetics and using my hands to build things. Slowly I realized that while the complex systems I was designing in school were intellectually fascinating, I was more deeply satisfied building a complicated piece of furniture. So I took my master’s degree and left to pursue making a living designing and building furniture.”

Christy Oates - Saturday June 21,  1:30 - 2:45 in Commons A

On-going 3-day workshop – digiFabulous, with Reuben Foat and Kimo Griggs in Building 306A and Building 304A

digiFabulous is a 3-day conference event sponsored in part by ShopBot Tools and AutoDesk. It will highlight Christy, Reuben Foat, & Kimo Griggs, artists who work digitally. During the event they will each work live on their own CNC project allowing conference-goers to engage with them and experience how real artists interface with and execute high-quality designs using CNC technology.

digiFabulous Panel Discussion, moderated by Perry Price with panelists Ted Hall, Kimo Griggs, & Reuben Foat

Following the three day digiFabulous event, join the conversation as we delve deeper into the use of digital fabrication by the event participants, the future of the technologies as envisioned by its proponents, and examine lessons learned by the community. Expect a conversational but uncompromising look at the promise and the perils of new technologies for the field.

As an artist and furniture maker with a background in manufacturing, Christy is inspired by digital making combined with traditional woodworking techniques. She uses computer-aided drafting programs and CNC machines like laser cutters to create her work. She received her MFA from San Diego State University, where she created her thesis project around transforming environments. Her folding furniture is made for living in small spaces with the idea is that less is more, and her designs are made using eco-friendly materials and cutting processes. Christy was recently featured in 40 under 40: Craft Futures at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington D.C.

Alison Ospina - Thursday June 19,  10:15 - 12:15 in Building 304 C

Workshop: Stools & Small Tables

This workshop will be hands-on, allowing participants to try their hand at making a small green wood structure using unseasoned alder. Although there will not be time to complete a project, during the two hours, participants will gain an understanding of the following: ● principles of working with unseasoned wood ● use of specialized green wood tools ● woods which are suitable for green wood construction ● coppicing and woodland management ● surface finishing

Friday June 20,  10:15 - 11:15 in Commons A

Presentation: Irish Green Wood Chairs

“Green wood chair making challenges you to trust you intuition.... relinquish the control you normally have over your materials. You are working with the wood— not imposing a form on it. This is the art of the possible, where your design ideas are only limited by your ability to carry them out. Once you have developed a certain level of mastery of the techniques, you apply them automatically or subconsciously, using your body and your intuition to measure and make. You are working with a yielding material, creating soft flowing forms and working with the grain.”

Friday June 20,  3:00 - 5:00 in Building 304 C

Workshop: Chair Making

This workshop will be hands-on, allowing participants to try their hand at making a full-sized chair. This is a slightly more advanced workshop and would be ideally suited to those who have attended the earlier Stools and Small Tables workshop or have previous experience in chair making and/or working with green wood. Although there will not be time to complete a project within the 2-hour window, participants will gain an understanding of the following: ● designing in response to materials ● principles of working with unseasoned wood ● use of specialized green wood tools ● woods which are suitable for green wood construction ● coppicing and woodland management ● variety of surface finishing techniques/materials ● variety of natural seating materials

Alison has been chair-making in West Cork, since 1996, using locally coppiced hazel wood. She is a member of a local guild of craftspeople in West Cork, and teaches her craft from her own studio and also at a local college. She is author of the book Green Wood Chairs (2009).

Allan Parachini - Thursday June 19,  11:30 – 12:15 in Commons A

Responsibly Sourced Materials with Ian Hanna

We love to use beautiful woods in our work. How do we know the origins of materials we use and whether any of those materials represent endangered resources? Recent prosecutions of guitar makers for using illegally sourced wood have raised the profile of this issue. Join FS Board Member Allan Parachini and FSC (International) Business Development Director Ian Hanna for this panel discussion.

Friday June 20,  11:30 - 12:15 in School House 1

Sustainability / Responsibly Resourced Materials with John Wiggers

This interactive discussion will focus on the obligations makers feel they may have to assure the integrity of the materials they use, especially the sourcing of actually or potentially endangered woods. As governments around the globe focus increasingly on timber poaching and wood smuggling, it may be difficult for a solo maker to gain access to all the information needed to know if his/her materials were legitimately produced, but with the increased world focus on the environment, furniture makers have no choice but to increase their consciousness of these issues.

Allan launched his business, Allan Parachini Custom Furniture, in 2010 in Pasadena, CA and relocated to Kilauea, HI on the island of Kauai in 2012. He began making furniture in the early 1980s during a career in the news and communications industries that spanned more than 45 years. He was a wire service and newspaper reporter in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles, for more than 25 years. He also held public relations management positions at nonprofits as diverse as the ACLU of Southern California and the California Community Foundation. He was public information officer for the Los Angeles Superior Court for nearly nine years.

Peter Pierobon - Thursday June 19,  9:00 - 10:00 in Commons A, B, & C

Reinterpreting My Roots

In keeping with the theme of this conference, Rooted: Creating a Sense of Place, Peter will be sharing his own personal story seeking inspiration and education in the field of furniture design and then returning to his hometown to express that new understanding. Reinterpreting his physical surroundings after almost 20 years of living away will hopefully make for an inspirational journey. Although it is unconventional for furniture to be the vehicle of a creative exploration of landscape and place, that is exactly what he has endeavored to accomplish. He has explored themes and materials that include mountains, the foreshore, and nautical design.

Peter is a creative, innovative and internationally acclaimed artist with 25 years of experience inspired by the west coast elements. His pieces are all meticulously handcrafted including combinations of metal, stone and wood from local sources minimizing the environmental impact. Components for each piece are individually selected to create a finished product that is sculpturally resolved, structurally sound and elegant - a masterpiece with a great story.

Perry Price - Thursday June 19,  1:30 - 2:45 in Commons A

A Material Question: Craft, Design, & Skill in Education

Rapid advances in material processes combined with the fears that current trends have left contemporary craft behind while de-skilling has entered the lexicon of art education have some speculating that craft must align itself with design to survive. A Material Question queries the viability of these assumptions and proposes the centrality of material-based education to the future of the field.

Saturday June 21,  1:30 - 2:45 in Commons A

digiFabulous Panel Discussion, moderated by Perry Price, with panelists Ted Hall, Kimo Griggs, Reuben Foat, & Christy Oates

Following the three day digiFabulous event, join the conversation as we delve deeper into the use of digital fabrication by the event participants, the future of the technologies as envisioned by its proponents, and examine lessons learned by the community. Expect a conversational but uncompromising look at the promise and the perils of new technologies for the field.

Perry is the Director of Education for the American Craft Council, where he is responsible for programming and outreach providing thought leadership and cultivating critical thinking on the field of contemporary craft. Prior to joining the ACC, he served as Curator of Exhibitions and Collections for Fuller Craft Museum in Brockton, Massachusetts. He is a graduate of the Cooperstown Graduate Program in Museum Studies and Johns Hopkins University, and is a scholar of American craft, design, and material culture.

Dean Pulver - Three-Day Event in the Edensaw Tent

From the Forest

From the Forest, an interactive event, will be led by local furniture makers and educators adept at working with traditional woodworking tools. Starting with a whole Madrona tree, a log, some dried slabs from local trees and salvaged rippings from our local lumberyard, participants and workshop leaders will work in a loose and creative manner working green and salvaged materials with an array of traditional and nontraditional tools.  There will be demos throughout the day by various makers from riving a plank from a log to finishing and everything in between.

Dean Pulver is a full time furniture maker and sculptor living in Taos, New Mexico.  He is primarily a woodworker who makes his living through one of a kind works, private commissions, and limited production sales.  He has taught at the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, Penland School of Crafts, and Anderson Ranch Arts Center.  His works are shown in galleries and museum exhibitions and collections nationally. 

Seth Rolland - Three-Day Event in the Edensaw Tent

From the Forest

From the Forest, an interactive event, will be led by local furniture makers and educators adept at working with traditional woodworking tools. Starting with a whole Madrona tree, a log, some dried slabs from local trees and salvaged rippings from our local lumberyard, participants and workshop leaders will work in a loose and creative manner working green and salvaged materials with an array of traditional and nontraditional tools.  There will be demos throughout the day by various makers from riving a plank from a log to finishing and everything in between.

Seth is a custom furniture maker living in Port Townsend, WA.  He produces custom commissions for clients, speculative pieces for shows and semi production designs for museum stores and galleries across the country.  His furniture is influenced by natural forms, Japanese and Danish aesthetics, and explorations of structure, materials and balanced asymmetry.  Mostly self taught with a few key workshops along the way, Seth occasionally teaches workshops at various craft schools including the Port Townsend School of Woodworking.

Jaap Romijn - Three-Day Event in the Edensaw Tent

From the Forest

From the Forest, an interactive event, will be led by local furniture makers and educators adept at working with traditional woodworking tools. Starting with a whole Madrona tree, a log, some dried slabs from local trees and salvaged rippings from our local lumberyard, participants and workshop leaders will work in a loose and creative manner working green and salvaged materials with an array of traditional and nontraditional tools.  There will be demos throughout the day by various makers from riving a plank from a log to finishing and everything in between.

Jaap holds a degree in sculpture. He has been a boatbuilder, toy designer, successful furniture designer/maker in the Bay Area, and, for the last few years, a sculptor.

Jay T Scott - Friday June 20,  11:30 - 12:15 in Commons A

What's Next? with Daryl Morgan

When students graduate and want to continue woodworking, their options are limited. Determined graduates will find a way to continue learning but the measured, sequential kind of training, like apprenticeship, is a thing of the past. The hope for the future of craft education lies with established craft professionals who are willing to pass their skills and experience to the next generation. Most artisans don't have the time or the inclination to take on apprentices. Are there ways for local collective groups of craft professionals to make sure the body of craft knowledge remains available and relevant?

I was born in Ohio and began working with wood at a young age. As a teenager, I apprenticed with my uncle who was a furniture maker. I moved to Olympia, Washington in 1989 to attend The Evergreen State College where I studied agriculture, entomology and furniture making. I worked with a custom homebuilder during college and started my own woodworking business in 1996.

My life changed significantly when I began to integrate the inspirations of my life and work. It began when I was given a copy of James Krenov’s “A Cabinetmaker’s Notebook” by my uncle. I strongly related to his message of doing the work you love with great passion. When I started at The College of the Redwoods fine woodworking program in 2000, I was surrounded by this passion for the work and it pushed me to do my best. The woodworking program exemplified the relationship to the work that I was searching for. I have carried this passion into my work at my shop in Olympia where I continue to explore.

Adrien Segal for AutoDesk - Saturday June 21, 4:00 - 5:00 in School House 2

Navigating the Artist Residency

Finding the right path for your creative practice can be a challenge - finding the right creative community can make your practice thrive. There are over 500 artist residency programs in the United States, offering a variety of resources, facilities, settings, stipends and fees, and expectations, with a shared purpose to provide artists with time and space for the creation of new work. In this talk, Adrien will share her personal experiences participating in a number of residencies and offer guidance about what to look for if you are thinking about applying for an artist residency program.

After receiving a degree in Furniture Design from California College of the Arts in 2007, Adrien has taken an interdisciplinary approach to furniture as a communicative medium. Integrating scientific research, data visualization, and furniture, her work translates natural cycles and scientific statistics into physical forms using traditional woodworking techniques, CAD fabrication, and sculptural carving. Adrien has been an Artist in Residence at the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland, the Bunnell Art Center in Homer, Alaska, the Lucid Arts Foundation in Inverness, CA, and is currently in residence at Autodesk's Pier 9 Workshop in San Francisco. In addition to teaching, she maintains an active creative practice out of her studio on the former Naval Base in Alameda, CA.

Susie J Silbert - Thursday June 19,  4:00 - 5:00 in Commons A

Location as Material: a Curatorial and Historical Perspective

This lecture will take the idea of local materials and turn it on its head exploring a history of artists and furniture designers using the landscape and the location as their inspiration. Rooted in my recent experience at the Desert Design Lab and incorporating research from my exhibition, SPRAWL, this lecture will also look at historical adaptations to local landscape such as early American woodworkers shifting from mahogany to local woods.

Saturday June 21,  3:00 - 3:50 in School House 1

Traveling Collaborations with Vivian Beer

In this lecture Vivian and Susie will take you on a cross country journey following Vivian’s Desert Design Lab project. The project, supported by the John D. Mineck Furniture Fellowship, traveled for two months in an RV trailer (a mobile studio/home) through the America’s Western Deserts with two goals. The first to develop Beer’s new Desert Impressions body of work spending an extended period of time in a number of remote landscapes/eco-systems to gather images and textures. The second, to foster exchange by inviting a number of artist/designers/writers/craftsmen to collaborate on location. Visitors included, Susie Silbert, Jenn Anderson, Tanya Aguiniga, Noah Sakamoto, Adrien Segal, Hannah Vaughan, Josh Torbick, Sophie Glenn, and Steffanie Dotson. The presentation will share and “unpack” the project, what it means to travel for inspiration, work with place and collaborate in a new environment.

Susie J. Silbert is an independent curator and design historian with a background in craft and design and a passion for interpreting the built world. Her recent projects include SPRAWL, co-curated with Anna Walker at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, the catalogue to Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and a data-driven analysis for the New-York Historical Society in support of the exhibition The Folk Art Collection of Elie Nadelman: Making it Modern in addition to numerous essays on artists working in glass, ceramics, wood and metal. Silbert holds a Master’s Degree in Decorative Arts, Design History and Material Culture from the Bard Graduate Center and lectures on the History of Glass at the Rhode Island School of Design. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Jim Tolpin - Thursday June 19,  1:30 - 2:45 in School House 1

Repeated on Friday June 20,  4:00 - 5:00 in School House 2

Design at the Point of a Tool

The industrial revolution not only eclipsed hand skills and replaced them with automation, but it also silenced a common design language that artisans had shared through an oral tradition for millennia. This 19th century revolution, motivated by westward expansion and the need to produce numerical cut-lists for the efficient indexing of machines and economical utilization of materials, moved the design process away from the traditional artisan’s trade to the mathematical (irrational number) and, later, graphic arts-based language of engineers. Woodworkers (as did artisans in many other trades) saw not only their skills drift toward obsolescence, but the very act of design itself. This presentation shows how we can recapture the language of the pre-industrial artisans and re-open the door to the inherent abilities that each of us has to create durable and beautiful designs at the “Point of a Tool.”

Jim is one of the founders of the Port Townsend School of Woodworking. A prolific author, Jim has written 16 books on woodworking, cabinetmaking and design. His most recent book By Hand and Eye explores the traditional artisanal techniques of design or "design at the point of a tool.”

Kris Tucker - Friday June 20,  10:15 - 11:15 in School House 1

Arts in the Public Interest: Space, Community, Heritage, Legacy

This will be a lively discussion about the nature of public investment in the arts, including insider perspectives with stories and photos about public art, community design, and arts education.

Kris Tucker served as Executive Director of the Washington State Arts Commission (ArtsWA) 1999-2014. She is a leader in the state and national arts community and a tenacious advocate for the arts. At ArtsWA, Kris led a staff of 12 to provide programs and services including Art in Public Places, Arts in Education, grants to organizations, and community partnerships. Kris was previously Executive Director of the Boise City Arts Commission; Arts & Entertainment Editor of the Boise Weekly; and a freelance writer. She earned her MA in Whole Systems Design from Antioch University Seattle, and her BA from Oregon State University. She is vice chair of the Board of the Olympia Artspace Alliance. She served as a grant panelist for the National Endowment for the Arts, and served for 14 years as a Trustee and board officer for the Western States Arts Federation (WESTAF).

 

John Wiggers - Friday June 20,  11:30 - 12:15 in School House 1

Sustainability / Responsibly Resourced Materials with Allan Parachini

This interactive discussion will focus on the obligations makers feel they may have to assure the integrity of the materials they use, especially the sourcing of actually or potentially endangered woods. As governments around the globe focus increasingly on timber poaching and wood smuggling, it may be difficult for a solo maker to gain access to all the information needed to know if his/her materials were legitimately produced, but with the increased world focus on the environment, furniture makers have no choice but to increase their consciousness of these issues.

John has been a full time studio furniture maker for more than 30 years, and was an active early pioneer in the sustainable wood movement that began in the late 1980s. At one time employing as many as 25 full time artisans, John recently scaled back into a much smaller and more sustainable studio space on a quiet rural property — where, in addition to making furniture, he helps his wife grow organic vegetables from heritage seed in raised garden beds. John is interested in mentoring students and emerging makers on the business realities of studio furniture making in today’s ever more globalized world of craft.

Steve Withycombe -

Thursday June 19,  11:30 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

Friday June 20,  10:15 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

Saturday June 21,  1:30 – 5:00 in Room A, Bldg 315

On-going 3-day workshop with Ashley Eriksmoen - Re-Forestation: How to Make a Tree from a Chair

The workshop is a project by Ashley Eriksmoen joined by Steve Withycombe and Michael Hamilton. Attendees are able to drop-in, make together, and contribute to the production of our own collaborative grove of trees made from broken and abandoned wood furniture. The format of the workshop will be similar to projects at past conferences such as the Allagash Barrel Project in Maine.

Steve received his AOS degree in Woodworking and Furniture Design from the School of American Crafts at Rochester Institute of Technology and then a BFA in Furniture Design at the Rhode Island School of Design. He found himself across the country, where he opened his first studio in the Georgetown neighborhood of South Seattle where he’s found endless inspiration from a unique community founded on art, social interaction, and industrial surroundings left from a forgotten era of the Northwest. Steve has been designing and building furniture and commercial spaces throughout the Seattle area since 1999. In addition, he works in the Architecture Department of the University of Washington helping maintain the facilities and instructing young creatives about the art of furniture making and design.

Stewart Wurtz - Thursday June 19,  10:15 - 11:15 in Commons A

NXNW 2014

Stewart will give a visual presentation of creative objects by makers from the Pacific Northwest. Delivered in three sections of 60 stimulating images in a fast-paced and concise format: past, present, future… wood, metal, glass, stone and beyond. The work, the inspirations, and the discoveries lead to a slice of what’s happening inside the current Northwest oyster.

Stewart maintains his studio in the Fremont neighborhood of Seattle. He is inspired by the minimalism of modern form and design and embellishes this simplicity with details that reveal process, structure, or the hand of the maker. He combines wood with other materials, like metal, as the play between them can enhance each material and encourage new discoveries.

Tak Yoshino - Thursday June 19,  3:00 - 3:50 in School House 1

Presentation: Zen Chairs

Chairs are mass-produced with designs that are visually appealing to consumers but the comfort of sitting for a long time is neglected. Tak looked at his cultural heritage and found the answer in Zazen (the tradition of Zen sitting). Each chair is hand crafted to the individual's ideal angle of the pelvis to keep the backbone curved. The head and shoulder sit in line with the pelvis, correctly keeping the upper body erect.

Saturday June 21,  1:30 – 3:30 in Room B, Building 315

Demonstration: Japanese Handplanes for Shaping

Tak started woodworking in 1980. From 1995 to present Tak as been researching proper chiropractic posture and Zazen flow of Ki energy to create a chair that supports one's perfect sitting position. Tak's work has been recognized with a "Best of the Show" at the 2013 Hawai'i Forestry Industry Woodshow.

 

Tour 1 - At the Crossroads

Wednesday, June 18th

Seattle and Puget Sound have been the crossroads for different cultures for at least 160 years. Bainbridge Island is one of the nexus points.

tour1 Japanese Guesthouse from the gardens below

This was a full day tour of the Bloedel Reserve and selected grounds along with the Japanese guesthouse. The Bloedel Reserve combines the best of European and Asian influences with gorgeous formal grounds, spectacular buildings, and a Japanese guesthouse containing Nakashima furniture.

tiur1-2 Main entry path to the guest house

During World War II, the Japanese population of Bainbridge Island was sent to internment camps. The tour also visited the Bainbridge Island Art Museum where there was a showing of the National Park Service film about the World War II Manzinar and Minidoka internment camps.

The tour also visited the Internment Memorial. After the World War II, the population of Bainbridge Island welcomed back the internees. The Internment Memorial is humbling reminder that citizenship (or patriotism) is not determined by race.

tour1-3 Bloedel home entry

Following the Internment Memorial the tour visited the Suquamish Museum, where Tribal members explained the history of their craft and artifacts.

Tour 2 - Celebrating the Traditional Maritime Trades

Wednesday, June 18th

boatbuilding NW Boatbuilding School

Port Hadlock and Port Townsend are synonymous with the best in traditional wooden boat building and repair. Trades like rigging and sail-making thrive too. The tour visited to the NW School of Wooden Boat Building where they teach both traditional and contemporary wooden boatbuilding skills while developing the individual as a craftsperson. One of the premier accredited educational institutions of its kind in North America, the school has been in operation on the Olympic Peninsula since 1981 and attracts adult vocational students from around the world while building 12-15 boats each year. The school’s Executive Director, Pete Leenhouts, and Director of Education, Pam Roberts, led the tour through the Port Hadlock campus.

Adventuress at Boat Haven Adventuress at Boat Haven

The tour also stopped at the Port Townsend Boat Haven, a bustling boat yard in action. Boat Haven repair activities take care of a large fishing and recreational fleet every year. The tour visited Haven Boatworks to see a large commercial wooden repair company in action and talk to the owners about the work they and their crew accomplish on a routine basis, including taking care of the century-old historic schooner ADVENTURESS.

martimecenter Northwest Maritime Center

Final stop of the tour was the Northwest Maritime Center, including the  boat shop, livery operation and chandlery fronting the harbor of Point Hudson on the northeast end of town. The Northwest Maritime Center is one of the anchors of the scenic city of Port Townsend, and boasts an incredible view of the waters and mountains surrounding the Victorian Seaport.

 

Tour 3 - Explore Fort Worden Passport

tour3-2 The Passport tour provided Wednesday through Saturday admission to the Coast Artillery Museum, the Commanding Officers Quarters, and the Port Townsend Marine Science Center,  the Point Wilson Light house, guided tours of the fort's bunkers and Artillery Hill and a tour of the beach at low tide.

tour3-1 The Coast Artillery Museum tells the story of, and features artifacts from, Fort Worden's past as a military installation guarding the entrance to Puget Sound. The Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum was established in 1976 to preserve and interpret coast artillery history with special emphasis on the harbor defenses of Puget Sound as they existed and functioned from the late 1800s to the end of World War II. The museum also has exhibits showing the history of Fort Worden from its beginnings in 1897 through its use as a military base, a state diagnostic and treatment center for adolescents, and finally as one of the premier state parks in Washington.

The Commanding Officers Quarters is one of Fort Worden's finest buildings. The COQ, is one of many Fort Worden buildings featured in the movie An Officer and A Gentleman (1982). It was completed in April 1904, and many different families resided there. Located at the head of Officers’ Row, the Commanding Officer’s Quarters overlooks Admiralty Inlet, with Mt. Baker and the Cascades in the background. Late Victorian and Edwardian furnishings provide a unique glimpse into the life of a senior U.S. Army officer and his family in the first decade of the 20th century.

tour3 Point Wilson Lighthouse was first established in 1879. The light was originally on top of the lighthouse keeper's residence. The name of the light and the point it stands on comes from Captain George Vancouver, who first sighted the point in May of 1792. In 1913 the present distinctive structure was built. The fixed white light with a red flash every 20 seconds comes from a 1000-watt bulb through a rotating fourth-order Fresnel lens. The light has a range of sixteen miles. Before electricity, the light was produced by an oil lamp, which is said to have burned three gallons of oil a night.

Port Townsend Marine Science Center Visit the marine exhibit for a hands-on experience with local, live animals in aquariums and touch tanks. Next, venture to the Natural History Exhibit where scientific investigation and conservation are featured. Use interactive games and videos to learn about the orca named Hope whose skeleton hangs from the ceiling, and the role that humans play in the Salish Sea ecosystem. Sign up for a guided beach walk or a bird-watching session with an experienced bird watcher.

Exhibitions for FS14

Faculty Selects

The Furniture Society's presentation of top student work in 2014 was exhibited digitally on The Furniture Society website as well as at the conference site at Fort Worden in Port Townsend, Washington. Entries were juried by Amy Devers.  Exhibition pieces were on display in the  Fort Worden Chapel.

devers

Amy Devers

Finish carpenter Amy Devers holds a MFA in furniture design from the Rhode Island School of Design. A metal, plastic and upholstery fabricator, Amy's commercial design projects include work for the Pasadena Museum of California Art bookstore, and her own original furniture has been exhibited in museums and galleries from Boston to Milan. Amy brings expert how-to instruction and contagious enthusiasm for her chosen profession to homeowners and viewers alike! Amy also shares her many talents as the host of DIY to the Rescue and Blog Cabin '07.

View the Faculty Selects 2014 Online Gallery

Sense of Place - Northwest Woodworkers Gallery

NWG

2111 First Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121

Northwest Woodworkers Gallery, located in downtown Seattle, hosted  this juried show open to all Pacific Northwest-based Furniture Society members.  Esteemed Furniture Society member Peter Pierobon, Port Townsend School of Woodworking Executive Director Tim Lawson and NWWG Gallery Director, Sharon Ricci considered technique, use of material, overall functionality and distinguished design as the criteria for curating a well-rounded showcase of the region's stellar studio furniture artist work.

The exhibit opened June 1st, with a public artists’ reception on Friday, June 13th from 6-9pm.  The gallery hosted a wine tasting by CloudLift Cellars in conjunction with the reception that evening.

cabinet

Coast Range Cabinet by juror Peter Pierobon

 

Members Gallery

chapel

The Fort Worden Chapel

The 2014 Conference in Port Townsend once again featured the Member's Gallery, a collective of furniture works produced by the membership over the last few years. The chapel on the Fort Worden campus will served as a gathering place to highlight the talents of the members. This event is a non-curated look at what is happening across The Furniture Society membership.

 

Slide Wars!

Slide Wars, a regular conference event, is an informal opportunity to share what you have been up to. All conference attendees are encouraged to participate by submitting  images of recent work. Makers narrate their work as their images are displayed. To kick off the event this year, Craft in America  put together some furniture segments from their PBS series, Craft in America, for everyone's enjoyment.

 

The Furniture Society is proud to announce the 2014 Award of Distinction Honorees,

Warren & Bebe Johnson

BWAODPortraitFSc

Notes from Andrew Glasgow, past Executive Director of the Furniture Society and the American Craft Council, about this year's honorees:

The dynamic duo being recognized with this year’s Furniture Society Award of Distinction is the imitable Bebe Pritam Johnson and Warren Eames Johnson. I think it is safe to say that without Bebe and Warren it is unlikely that there would be a Furniture Society as we know it. I know I would have never been on the radar without Bebe’s encouragement. I owe her a great deal.

Most of us know Bebe and Warren as the thoughtful, careful, and intentional owners of Pritam & Eames, the nation’s premier gallery for Studio Furniture. One wonders, however, what brought them to this point.

Warren and Bebe both studied philosophy early in their academic career. After receiving her Master’s degree in Communications from Boston University, Bebe would begin her real-world career and become Director, Asian Program Operations at the Council on International Educational Exchange in New York. Warren studied law and received a LLB from the University of Illinois, and pursued graduate economics at MIT. His career took a turn, however, when the Johnsons moved to New York, and he ended up studying film at Columbia University where he received an MFA. Warren co-authored a book on film production, taught film at various institutions including Columbia, and was cameraman/editor on a number of internationally based documentaries. After an interesting and successful decade, Warren and Bebe decided it was time for a change.

So, following the likes of De Kooning, Pollack and Larsen, they decamped to East Hampton, a bit before the glitterati of the 80s and 90s and, in another turn of career, carved out a life dedicated to craft: educating and offering to the public a retail opportunity, a public that sought them out in an historic old laundry building in East Hampton that became Pritam & Eames. For the last 33 years, Pritam & Eames has existed, both powerfully and quietly, out in Long Island for a very appreciative public.

Bebe and Warren were not satisfied with just selling the best studio furniture, they were also ambitious to contribute to the growing body of literature about this decorative arts field. This ambition led to conversations with makers and other intelligent aficionados that resulted in the publication of their book, Speaking of Furniture: Conversations with 14 American Masters [The Artist Book Foundation, 2013].

Personally, I can’t imagine anyone more deserving of the Award of Distinction than Bebe Pritam Johnson and Warren Eames Johnson. They built and crafted a business that has sustained them, given a boost to grateful makers, and played an important part in building the dialogue that underpins today’s studio furniture movement.